Locking diff help

tcook08xrunner

New Member
I apologize if this has already been answered previously but I figured rather than reviving an old thread I'll start a new.
Basically I'm just wondering what options we have for a better diff
Because I plan to drift my x but as I still use it as my daily Id rather not weld up my diff.
Recomendations?

Any and all help much appreciated
Thanks
 

Gadget

Well-Known Member
Yep, ARB. I ran front and rear ARBs on my 96 4Runner off road truck. Very nice locker.

G
 

fishsticks

Because fast lifted truck.
E-locker housing + open 4 pinion 3rd (commonly known as the 87-95 "V6" 3rd member) and Spartan locker or Detroit locker = probably the cheapest/best option. Or use the earlier IFS housing and wheel spacers. I BELIEVE the spring perch width is the same. The tube thickness and housings are the same except for the extra clearance for the E-locker motor. Use axles that match whatever housing you use.

Don't use an ARB in any high speed application. Actually, just don't use one period. Ask me how many air lines/o-rings I've helped fix/replace.
 
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tcook08xrunner

New Member
Yea the high speed thing is what I'm concerned about this is my first vehicle that ive done any major work to i have a lot to learn ill definitely look further into that, very helpful thanks!
 

Gadget

Well-Known Member
I had great luck with my ARBs. Never had a problem at all and drove that truck all over the country to 4Wheel meets.

When you say high speed, are you talking about road racing or turning them on or off at high speeds? Is driving really fast overheating the O-Rings? Or are you talking about the weird steering behavior with the locker on driving at high speed???

G
 

fishsticks

Because fast lifted truck.
I had great luck with my ARBs. Never had a problem at all and drove that truck all over the country to 4Wheel meets.

When you say high speed, are you talking about road racing or turning them on or off at high speeds? Is driving really fast overheating the O-Rings? Or are you talking about the weird steering behavior with the locker on driving at high speed???

G


Let me start by saying that everything breaks, and personally I've seen one ARB and three Detroits have catastrophic failures. The ARB's center pinion support broke (we think) and munched everything inside. All three Detroits were the victim of backlash from axle breakage.

The non-catastrophic ARB failures I've seen are primarily in severe use (rock crawling, high speed sand or mud) scenarios. Usually they are not a result of the unit itself failing, but air lines, gummed up solenoid valves or flaky compressors. Some times it's bad planning on the installation. I've helped replace more O rings at camp than I care to think about, but I don't have any data on WHY they fail. Nonetheless it always seems like we have a guy with an ARB acting up. It's a shame for the cost involved.

ARB recommends against engaging the locker under drive line torque, which means in the OPs case, he'd really want to run the locker engaged from the start line. I'm not sure if he wants a 100% spool at speed on pavement. Mechanicals lock under drive line torque and unlock when that torque is removed. To me, that's just a simpler system. Especially for purposely breaking traction. My 85 drifts on dirt and gravel roads. :top:

Now, ARBs are huge with the overland crowd and if I were to lock the front of my Taco, it would probably be with an ARB. But in my crawler where I need it to work and take a LOT of abuse? Detroit. IMO the OPs case is an abuse scenario, not a traction scenario.
 

Nashman

Active Member
back in the day i ran a welded 4 30 diff up front and 430 Detroit in the rear never brke it but if you snap a shaft i herd the detroit will die but this is what I have herd


and of course I ran hydro assist steering
 

fishsticks

Because fast lifted truck.
back in the day i ran a welded 4 30 diff up front and 430 Detroit in the rear never brke it but if you snap a shaft i herd the detroit will die but this is what I have herd

They will. I've seen it first hand a few times. The unloaded torque from the snapped axle shears the teeth off on the engagement gear. Detroit makes a rebuild kit, so it's only 150 or so to fix.

Fortunately Toyota rear axle shafts are pretty stout so it doesn't happen a lot. I got a smokin deal on a full float kit with chrome moly axles a few years back so they're on my wheeler. Disc brakes and no more leaky wheel bearing seals. :top:
 
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