Tires: Unidirectional vs Multi-directional

lucke

New Member
Unidirectional tires are tires that have a forward facing tread pattern and can only be rotated front to back, and vice versa (except with staggered wheels).

falhzb.ang.jpg


Multi-directional tires have the tread in a non directional pattern and can be rotated normally (except with staggered wheels)

nithz0.ang.jpg
 
X

xRebeLx

Guest
Also some tires, like the second one and also our stock tire, can only be mounted on the rim one way. They have an inside and outside on them.:top:
 

cpezie

New Member
i really like the tread pattern on that second one, but i think i like the kdw pattern better..

I love the kdw2's they look crazy and stick like glue. I have them on my wifes 325i.:top:

I want to get some for my xr but would like to get new rims at the same time.
 

CBRBob

Active Member
I would think uni directional would have better traction, right?

ONLY in heavy rain. Thats the only reason street tires have tread sipes, to channel water. No rain, no sipes, more traction, aka, a slick.

That 2nd tire pictured has HUGE tread sipes, hence putting less rubber on the road and less traction in the dry(all else being equal, compounding etc.)

Directionals will also only wear one way so you may end up with a little rougher ride and more tread noise that can't be eliminated by tire rotation.
 

Scratchy

New Member
So if uni-directional tires are designed for increased traction, is this for acceleration or braking?
If it is indeed one or the other, then the rear and front tires on our trucks should be mounted in opposite directions, since the rear is for primarily acceleration and the front is for braking :dontknow:
.....things that make you go hmmmm?
 

lucke

New Member
So if uni-directional tires are designed for increased traction, is this for acceleration or braking?
If it is indeed one or the other, then the rear and front tires on our trucks should be mounted in opposite directions, since the rear is for primarily acceleration and the front is for braking :dontknow:
.....things that make you go hmmmm?
this thinking is wrong. uni-directional tires are not designed for acceleration or braking... just traction.
 

CBRBob

Active Member
So if uni-directional tires are designed for increased traction, is this for acceleration or braking?
If it is indeed one or the other, then the rear and front tires on our trucks should be mounted in opposite directions, since the rear is for primarily acceleration and the front is for braking :dontknow:
.....things that make you go hmmmm?

this thinking is wrong. uni-directional tires are not designed for acceleration or braking... just traction.

The directional designs are meant to move the water from the center to the outside edges of the tire while moving forward. They dont care if you are accelerating or braking. If it is dry they make no difference, they don't have better traction because of their directional tread design unless there is enough water on the road that they can dispel it better than a non directioal treaded tire. Think of it this way, a slick has zero tread sipes(maximum rubber on the ground) so (all else being equal like compound) they will have more traction, but in the rain they are horrible because they can'tmove water out to the sides, they just push it forward and eventually hydroplane on it.
 

Xample

New Member
The directional designs are meant to move the water from the center to the outside edges of the tire while moving forward. They dont care if you are accelerating or braking. If it is dry they make no difference, they don't have better traction because of their directional tread design unless there is enough water on the road that they can dispel it better than a non directioal treaded tire. Think of it this way, a slick has zero tread sipes(maximum rubber on the ground) so (all else being equal like compound) they will have more traction, but in the rain they are horrible because they can'tmove water out to the sides, they just push it forward and eventually hydroplane on it.
:dito: need a job...:laugh:
 

SickRedXRnr

"OK, Good Talk"
I think raversman just put the 2nd tire on his truck yesterday but 20s or 22s... i like the look of them, was going to go check out his truck soon, ill ask him how they ride
 

808red-x

New Member
wow... those one multidirectional tires are pretty cool. if i have camber in the front would those be the best type to use. and how much do they normally run for
 

46&2_X

New Member
The directional designs are meant to move the water from the center to the outside edges of the tire while moving forward. They dont care if you are accelerating or braking. If it is dry they make no difference, they don't have better traction because of their directional tread design unless there is enough water on the road that they can dispel it better than a non directioal treaded tire. Think of it this way, a slick has zero tread sipes(maximum rubber on the ground) so (all else being equal like compound) they will have more traction, but in the rain they are horrible because they can'tmove water out to the sides, they just push it forward and eventually hydroplane on it.

If I remeber correctly, unidirectional tires have better traction on dry pavement also, because the groves for channeling water away are facing twoards the direction the water is. They need to have less space in the sipes, and can be placed closer together.

At least I belive that was part of the reasoning behind unidirectional tires.


I thought radials were only supposed to be rotated front to back?

Justin


Nah it's more of an X pattern. LF to RR, RF to LR.

Or RR to RF, LF to LR.

or LF to LR, LR to RF, Rf to RR, RR to LF.

It all depends on the tires and the person. One is supposed to be the best but I can't remeber. Because every corner wears different.
 
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